Foot – coronavirus – Coronavirus: resumption of the Czech, Hungarian and Armenian Championships

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Interrupted like most other pandemic competitions from Covid-19, the Czech, Hungarian and Armenian Championships resume on Saturday February 29, when the referee and the delegate decided to postpone the match between Teplice and Slovan Liberec due to a field made impracticable by the melting snow, none of the witnesses present could imagine that, almost three months later, this same confrontation between two teams accustomed to the soft stomach of the Czech Championship would arouse such interest. late disputed & nbsp; in northern Bohemia, very close to Germany (south of Dresden), that the Czech Championship will resume its rights on Saturday (18 & nbsp; hours). A resumption behind closed doors and in the larger respect for hygiene measures, but in a country that was one of the very first in Europe to close its borders and where the wearing of a mask was made compulsory by the government from mid-March, including for outdoor physical activities, which remained authorized even at the height of confinement, this return to lawns may seem, for sports enthusiasts, to a symbolic outcome of the management of a health situation often cited as an example. A situation that, from mid-April, the Minister of Health was pleased to have "& Nbsp; under control & nbsp;". The classification of the Czech Championship At this weekend, as the deconfinement process enters its last phase, the country officially counts only about three hundred deaths caused by the new coronavirus, for a population of 10.5 million. Suddenly, the Czech League, also attentive to threats from UEFA, has never really considered stopping the current season. The 16 other elite clubs will play the first of the 6 remaining days of the season Tuesday and Wednesday – with in particular a clash between Sparta Prague (only 9th) and Viktoria Plzen (2nd) -, before the holding of the 5 & nbsp additional play-off days and a curtain drop planned for mid-July. Leader with 8 points before the interruption, Slavia Prague can consider celebrating its second title in a row in a stadium that will sound a little less hollow, since the gatherings of 500 and then 1 & nbsp; 000 people will be allowed to count , respectively, from June 8 and 22. The Slavia in isolation This almost cold restart after resuming training in small groups on April 20 is not without complications. This week, two players from Mlada Boleslav and Slavia, two teams that happen to meet on Tuesday, were tested positive at Covid-19. These contaminations, followed by new tests for the entire membership and club employees, will therefore not hinder the resumption of competition. A recovery already effective in Estonia since Tuesday and which also takes place Saturday in Hungary (Championship and Cup) and Armenia. This will then be the case for Denmark (Thursday), Poland and Serbia (May 29), Ukraine (May 30), then Austria (June 2), Portugal ( 3 & nbsp; June) and Croatia (5 & nbsp; June), as many countries relatively untouched by the coronavirus crisis. "Data-reactid =" 19 "> Interrupted like most other competitions by the Covid-19 pandemic, the Championships in the Czech Republic, Hungary and Armenia resume on Saturday February 29, when the referee and the delegate decided to postpone the match between Teplice and Slovan Liberec due to a terrain made impassable by the melting of the snow, none of the witnesses present could imagine that, almost three months later, this same confrontation between two teams accustomed to the soft stomach of the Czech Championship would arouse such interest. It is however by this late match disputed in the north of Bohemia, very close to Germany (south of Dresden), that l he Czech Championship will resume its rights on Saturday (6 p.m.). A resumption in camera and with the greatest respect for hygiene measures. But, in a country which was one of the very first in Europe to close its borders and where the wearing of the mask was made compulsory by the government from mid-March, including for outdoor physical activities, which were allowed even at the height of confinement, this return to the lawns may resemble, for sports enthusiasts, a symbolic outcome of the management of a health situation often cited as an example. A situation that, from mid-April, the Minister of Health was pleased to have " under control ". The classification of the Czech Championship At this weekend, as the deconfinement process enters its last phase, the country officially counts only about three hundred deaths caused by the new coronavirus, for a population of 10.5 million inhabitants. Suddenly, the Czech League, also attentive to threats from UEFA, has never really considered stopping the current season. The 16 other elite clubs will play the first of the 6 remaining days of the season Tuesday and Wednesday – with a clash between Sparta Prague (only 9th) and Viktoria Plzen (2nd) -, before the holding of the 5 additional days of play-offs and a curtain drop planned for mid-July. Leader with 8 points in advance before the interruption, Slavia Prague can consider celebrating its second title in a row in a stadium that will sound a little less hollow, since gatherings of 500 and then 1,000 people will be allowed to count, June 8 and 22, respectively. Slavia in isolation This almost cold restart after resuming training in small groups on April 20 is not without complications. This week, two players from Mlada Boleslav and Slavia, two teams that happen to meet on Tuesday, were tested positive at Covid-19. These contaminations, followed by new tests for the entire membership and club employees, will therefore not hinder the resumption of competition. A recovery already effective in Estonia since Tuesday and which also takes place on Saturday in Hungary (Championship and Cup) and in Armenia. This will then be the case for Denmark (Thursday), Poland and Serbia (May 29), Ukraine (May 30), then Austria (June 2), Portugal (June 3) and Croatia (June 5), all countries relatively spared from the coronavirus crisis.