AAF sued by a man who claims that the football league start-up was his idea • Parlay Game

  • Share on Facebook

  • Share on Twitter

  • Share on linkedin

<div _ngcontent-c14 = "" innerhtml = "

An AAF football ball rests on the ground, ready to be used during the pre-game warm-up of an AAF football game of the San Antonio fleet of San Diego commanders, the Sunday, February 24, 2019, at the SDCCU stadium in San Diego. (Parlay Game Photo / Peter Joneleit)ASSOCIATED PRESS

the The Alliance of American Football has given fans of the sport all its meaning to rejoice in the field, but the the Spring Spring League is now facing legal action.

L & # 39; AAF and his co-founder, Charlie Ebersol, are sued by Robert Vanech, who claims that the league was behind his idea. Vanech, co-founder and chief financial officer of Trebel Music, claims damages, equity in the CAA and public recognition as co-founder after claiming that Ebersol had violated a handshake agreement. Darren Rovell. Ebersol estimates that he deserves a 50% stake in the league. Vanech also claims that AAF co-founder Bill Polian has implemented many of his ideas.

L & # 39; AAF issued a statement Monday rejecting the costume.

"Mr. Vanech's claim is unfounded and there has never been a verbal or written agreement between Mr. Vanech and Mr. Ebersol regarding the Alliance, and we remain focused solely on our season. Inaugural history, each weekend bringing together more than 400 players the opportunity to showcase their talents and realize their dream of playing professional football. "

This is not the moment when the AAF made noise outside the league.

Just last week, the league announced that Carolina Hurricanes owner and CEO Tom Dundon had invested $ 250 million to keep the league running in the near future. This investment was made at about the same time that reports showed that the FAA was struggling to get paid, but the league blamed the one on the payroll services change and stated that the problem was not related to Dundon's investment.

Three weeks after the start of its inaugural season, the Alliance played its first games on February 9, broadcast on CBS. The eight teams of AAF are owned by the league, making it a unique entity.

While the quality of the game is missing from the NFL – the trainings are filled with NFL members and college stars who could not reduce it to the next level – ratings have been solid as football fans flock to a spring version Sport. The AAF attracted 2.1 million viewers for its debut Feb. 9. The February 16 match between Salt Lake and Birmingham attracted about a million viewers. It's fine for a league that has not started with a lot of fanfare.

It will be interesting to see if the AAF can maintain these numbers. Meanwhile, the league also has legal concerns to settle.

">

An AAF football ball rests on the ground, ready to be used during the pre-game warm-up of an AAF football game of the San Antonio fleet of San Diego commanders, the Sunday, February 24, 2019, at the SDCCU stadium in San Diego. (Parlay Game Photo / Peter Joneleit) ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Alliance of American Football has given a lot to its fans in the field, but the first spring division is now facing legal action.

AAF and its co-founder, Charlie Ebersol, are sued by Robert Vanech, who claims that the league was behind his idea. Vanech, co-founder and chief financial officer of Trebel Music, claims damages, equity in the CAA and public recognition as co-founder after claiming that Ebersol had violated a handshake agreement. Darren Rovell. Ebersol estimates that he deserves a 50% stake in the league. Vanech also claims that AAF co-founder Bill Polian has implemented many of his ideas.

L & # 39; AAF issued a statement Monday rejecting the costume.

"Mr. Vanech's claim is unfounded and there has never been a verbal or written agreement between Mr. Vanech and Mr. Ebersol regarding the Alliance, and we remain focused solely on our season. Inaugural history, each weekend bringing together more than 400 players the opportunity to showcase their talents and realize their dream of playing professional football. "

This is not the moment when the AAF made noise outside the league.

Just last week, the league announced that Carolina Hurricanes owner and CEO Tom Dundon had invested $ 250 million to keep the league running in the near future. This investment was made at about the same time that reports showed that the FAA was struggling to get paid, but the league blamed the one on the payroll services change and stated that the problem was not related to Dundon's investment.

Three weeks after the start of its inaugural season, the Alliance played its first games on February 9, broadcast on CBS. The eight teams of AAF are owned by the league, making it a unique entity.

Although the quality of the game is not up to the NFL's – the lineups are full of NFL attacks and college stars who have not managed to reduce it to the next level – the odds were strong then that football fans flock to a spring version of the sport. The AAF attracted 2.1 million viewers for its debut Feb. 9. The February 16 match between Salt Lake and Birmingham attracted about a million viewers. It's fine for a league that has not started with a lot of fanfare.

It will be interesting to see if the AAF can maintain these numbers. Meanwhile, the league also has legal concerns to settle.

%d bloggers like this: